CRITICISM IS FUTILE

THE STORY OF “TWO GUN” CROWLEY – THE KILLER

ON May 7, 1931, New York City witnessed the most sensational man-hunt the old town had ever known. After weeks of search, “Two Gun” Crowley-the killer, the gun-man who didn’t smoke or drink-was at bay, trapped in his sweetheart’s apartment.

One hundred and fifty policemen and detectives laid sieze to his top-floor hideaway. Chopping holes in the roof, they tried to smoke out Crowley, the “cop killer,” with tear gas. Then they mounted their machine guns on surrounding buildings, and for more than an hour one of New York’s fine residential sections reverberated with the crack of pistol fire and the rat-tat-tat sound of machine guns. Crowley, crouching behind an overstuffed chair, fired constantly at the police. Ten thousand excited people watched the battle.

When Crowley was captured, Police Commissioner Mulrooney declared that the two-gun desperado was one of the most dangerous criminals ever encountered in the history of New York. “He will kill,” said the Commissioner, “at the drop of a feather.”

But how did the “Two Gun” Crowley regard himself? We know, because while the police were firing into his apartment, he wrote a letter addressed “To whom it may concern.” And, as he wrote, the blood flowing from his wounds left a crimson trail on the paper. In this letter Crowley said: “Under my coat is a weary heart, but a kind one-one that would do nobody any harm.”

A short time before this, Crowley had been having a necking party on a country road out on Long Island. Suddenly a policeman walked up to the parked car and said: “Let me see your license.”

Without saying a word, Crowley drew his gun and cut the policeman down with a shower of lead. As the dying officer fell, Crowley leaped out of the car, grabbed the officer’s revolver, and fired another bullet into the prostrate body. And that was the killer who said: “Under my coat is a weary heart, but a kind one-one that would do nobody any harm.”

Crowley was sentenced to the electric chair. When he arrived at the death house at Sing Sing, did he say, “This is what I get for killing people?” No, he said: “This is what i get for defending myself.”

The point of the story is this: “Two Gun” Crowley didn’t blame himself for anything. Here , we can be sure that , ninety nine times out of a hundred, no man ever criticizes himself for anything, no matter how wrong he may be.

Criticism is futile because it puts a man on the defensive, and usually makes him strive to justify himself. Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a man’s precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses his resentment.

There you are; human nature in action, the wrongdoer blaming everybody but himself. We are all like that. So when you and I are tempted to criticize someone tomorrow, let’s remember “Two Gun” Crowley, Let’s realize that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself, and condemn us in return; or he will say: ” I don’t see how I could have done differently from what I have.”

“IF YOU WANT TO GATHER HONEY, DON’T KICK OVER THE BEEHIVE”

Published by johnranjit

Lifestyle Blogger

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